A Desparate Dad – John 4, By Ty Tamasaka

A Desperate Dad

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46 Once more he visited Cana in Galilee, where he had turned the water into wine. And there was a certain royal official whose son lay sick at Capernaum. 47 When this man heard that Jesus had arrived in Galilee from Judea, he went to him and begged him to come and heal his son, who was close to death.

48 “Unless you people see signs and wonders,” Jesus told him, “you will never believe.”

49 The royal official said, “Sir, come down before my child dies.”

50 “Go,” Jesus replied, “your son will live.”

The man took Jesus at his word and departed. 51 While he was still on the way, his servants met him with the news that his boy was living. 52 When he inquired as to the time when his son got better, they said to him, “Yesterday, at one in the afternoon, the fever left him.”

53 Then the father realized that this was the exact time at which Jesus had said to him, “Your son will live.” So he and his whole household believed.

54 This was the second sign Jesus performed after coming from Judea to Galilee.”  John 4:49-54 NIV

When Jesus visited Galilee, a royal official came to see Him.  The official’s son was ill in Capernaum.  The royal official was a powerful man.  The Greek word used to describe him could be translated “mini-king.”  He had power, prestige, prominence, and popularity, and could buy anything he wanted, but he still faced sorrow and tragedy with his son being deathly ill.

Apparently, the words about Jesus turning the water to wine had spread so the royal official came and begged Jesus to come and heal his son.  In doing so, we see two pre-requisites for a miracle.    

1 – The Roman official expressed belief in Jesus. 

He called out to Jesus.  When Jesus heard the official begging for his son’s life, Jesus reply was rather unusual.

48 “Unless you people see signs and wonders,” Jesus told him, “you will never believe.”

Jesus was not addressing just the man, but the crowd that had gathered.  He criticized those who believed only based on the signs and wonders they saw that amused them.

The royal official continues to plead with Jesus for his son’s life.

“Sir, come down before my child dies.”

Jesus replied.

“Go… your son will live.”

Here’s an interesting point.  Everybody wanted to see a miracle before they would believe.  Jesus flipped it around.  “If you believe, I’ll perform the miracle.”  Jesus performed the healing long distance so no one would see the healing.  Faith in Jesus here, is coupled with obedience.  The miracle Jesus performed was in partnership with two things.

Second, he had to obey Jesus.

2 – The Roman official had to obey Jesus. 

He had to go home and walk away without the miracle he was so desperate for.   

Upon his arrival back home, the Roman official’s servant’s came to tell him the great news about his son getting better.  It seems the Roman official had some doubt as to whether his son was healed by Jesus or if he just got better.

“52 When he inquired as to the time when his son got better, they said to him, “Yesterday, at one in the afternoon, the fever left him.”

53 Then the father realized that this was the exact time at which Jesus had said to him, “Your son will live.”

As a result of the miracle, like the doubting Samaritan woman at the well who led the Samaritans to faith, the doubting father led his household to faith in Jesus.

“So he and his whole household believed.”

When has Jesus answered your prayer?  Have you led your household to believe in Him?

Lord Jesus You are the great miracle worker, but more importantly, You are the Son of God, the Messiah, the Christ, the Chosen One of God.  I believe in You.  Help me believe more.  In the name of Jesus Christ, amen. 

Ty Tamasaka is an author who hold a Master of Arts Degree from Pacific Rim Christian University in Christian Ministry  He is a Bible teacher who loves to encourage people to enjoy Jesus’ grace and extend His Kingdom. Ty just released his new book More than a Conqueror: 5 Pathways to Personal Revival.    

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